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Call for sessions at the FSFE assembly during 34C3

From December 27 to 30, there will be the 34th Chaos Communication Congress happening in Leipzig. As in recent years, the FSFE is happy to host an assembly that includes an information booth, self-organised sessions and a meeting point for all friends of Free Software to come together, share or simply relax. This is our call for participation.

Free Software song sing-along at the FSFE-assembly during 33C3

With the CCC moving from Hamburg to Leipzig, there are not only logistic changes to be done but also some organisational changes. We are still figuring out the details, but in the context of this call, one of the major changes will be the loss of free available rooms to book for self-organised sessions. Instead, assemblies that match with each other are asked to cluster around 1 of several stages and use that as a common stage for self-organized sessions together. To make the most of this situation, the FSFE will for the first time not join the Noisy Square this year but form a new neighbourhood with other freedom fighting NGOs – in particular with our friends from European Digital Rights. However, at this point of time, we do not yet have more information about the concrete or final arrangements.

Call for session

Regardless of those details that still need to be sorted out, this is our call for participation. Sessions can be inspiring talks, hands-on workshops, community/developer/strategy meetings or any other public, informative or collaborative activity.

Topics can be anything that is about or related to Free Software. We welcome technical sessions but we also encourage to give non-technical talks that address philosophical, economical or other aspects of/about Free Software. We also like sessions about related subjects that have a clear connection to Free Software for example privacy, data protection, sustainability and similar related topics. Finally, we welcome all backgrounds – from your private project to global community projects.

You have something different in mind? For our friends, it is also possible to have informal meetings, announcements or other activities at our assembly. In this case, get in contact with me (OpenPGP) and we figure it out.

Crowded room during What makes a secure mobile messenger? by Hannes Hauswedell, one of our sessions during 33C3.

Formalities

If you are interested in hosting a session at the FSFE assembly, please apply no later than

* Sunday, November 19, 18:00 UTC *

by sending an email to Erik Albers (OpenPGP) with the subject “Session at 34C3” and use the following template:

Title: name of your session
Description: description of your session
Type: talk / discussion / meeting / workshop …
Tags: put useful tags here
Link: (if there is a helpful link)
Expected number of participants: 20 or less / up to 40 / up to 100
About yourself: some words about you/your biography

You will be informed latest on Monday, November 27, if your session is accepted.

Good to know

  • If your session is accepted we happily take care of its proper organisation, publicity and everything else that needs to be done. You are welcome to simply come and give/host your session : )
    But this is neither a guarantee for a ticket nor do we take care of your ticket! Check the CCC-announcements and get yourself a ticket in time!
  • You do not need to be a supporter of the FSFE to host a session. On the contrary, we welcome external guests.
  • Please share this call with your friends or your favorite mailing list.

Related information:

For your inspiration:

Free Software Village Europe at SHA 2017

Tonight, the FSFE team Netherlands will arrive at SHA2017 and set up a village for FSFE. SHA-camp is a non-profit hacker-camp in the the Netherlands, similar to the CCCamps in Germany. During 5 days the FSFE will offer a public space for and by our members, friends and supporters to discuss, meet, hack and organise. Find an overview of our sessions and other specialties in this blog post. Find all details and updates on our dedicated FSFE-village-page. Let’s put the hacking back into politics!

Our curated track:

FSFE assembly on CCCamp15
FSFE village at CCCamp15

Free Software Song sessions

Everyday at the FSFE village, we will run a Free Software Song sing-along-session. In addition, and for the first time, we start a project to bring together a choir who performs the Free Software Song. You can read additional details and background about it in my previous blogpost.

The ultimate Free Software challenge

More or less anytime you can come to our village and try the ultimate Free Software challenge that will let you dig deep into the history of Free Software, so deep that you might reach the big-bang-moment of Free Software. Be prepared for an inspiring and challenging journey and bring some friends (or any randomly allocated companionship) to pass it together.

New promotion material and textiles

We will bring our all-time favorites as well as new promotion material to our village. New ones are the FSFE logo on a die-cut sticker, a Hacking for Freedom sticker and a Free your Android sticker. New textiles are a FSFE-hoody in burgundy and bibs.

CCCamp 2007 Datenklo

Still hacking anyway!

“Join us now” … at SHA2017

Summary: For the good vibe, we are planning another round of Free Software song sing-along-sessions at the FSFE village during SHA-camp in August this year. Thanks to Benjamin Wand we even run a project to bring together a choir that performs on stage and engages the audience to do a public crowdsinging. Read the details in this post, spread the word and join us!
Also read about the other projects and the current status of the FSFE village at the end of this post.

If you have been at the FSFE assembly at 33C3 or the year before, you may have seen or even took part in one of our multiple Free Software Song sing-along-sessions. People gathering at our assembly, bringing instruments, singing together and share their love for Free Software.

“Join us now and share the software. You’ll be free, Hackers!”
Because of this good adoption, we are already planning similar sessions at the FSFE village during SHA-camp in August this year. And we will go one step ahead.

Benjamin Wand was so inspired by our sing-along-sessions during 33C3 to compose a full set of music notation for a choir to sing the Free Software song in four voices. At SHA we like to give it a try and start a project to bring together a choir who performs the Free Software song. We reach out to other assemblies to get a stage and a momentum for this. It’s a 2h workshop and a potential live act. This is your chance: Join us now and sing out your love for Free Software!

In preparation you find Benjamin’s music sheet on imslp and on musescore where you can even listen to it. Please find all the other details and updates on the dedicated project page inside the SHA-wiki.

And now to something completely different

We are still preparing our village at SHA-camp to offer you an exciting and inspiring location, dipped into the mindset of Free Software. Our international team is always up for a short or a long talk and sharing knowledge. We will bring the latest promotion material and offer you the ultimate Free Software challenge.

On day 4, I will speak about How to make use of democratic elections for your own purpose. We also love to self-organize more sessions and reach out to other assemblies to make it happen. If you have some place for us or you are affiliated with the FSFE and like to give a talk/session, then contact us and we might be able to organise it.

In any case, it is worth to check our FSFE village page from time to time for updates.

Google, Autocomplete and “the Germans”

Last night I used Big Google to look for information about Germans and I found it was thrilling to see how variable Google’s Autocomplete feature fills up in different languages if you ask: “Why are there so many Germans … ?”

As I understand, Google’s Autocomplete is using an algorithm that in particular take notes of former search inquiries and offers you the three to four mostly used completions of your sentence. If this is the case, you can see what prejudices seem to exist or are partly reflected in the Autocomplete. Try it yourself and do not write the whole question to the end, just stop after the three first letters of “Germans” in your language.

Here are results based on languages, I know:

English
Well, looks like the English-speaking people hold Germans in high regards. If you ask Google “Why are there so many ger” it will try to autocomplete with German composers, philosophers and scientists:

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Free Software Ergo Sum

Today is “I love Free Software”-day and I made some graphics to say thank you to everyone in and around Free Software. All pictures CC0.

If Rene Descartes would think about the secure foundation of knowledge in the digital communication, then this must be in Free Software. “Free Software Ergo Sum”.

Oil on Canvas:

René Descartes (1596 – 1650)

Sticker:

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Worked for us: Thank you 33C3

Summary: A report of the FSFE assembly and activity during the 33rd edition of the Chaos Communication Congress (CCC), in short “33C3”. It is mainly a visual report along some pictures.

I am happy to see our assembly growing every year and having the possibility to bring our message of Software Freedom to the people at the Chaos Communication Congress (CCC) is priceless. The CCC is Germany’s biggest annual meetup of hackers and political activists that share knowledge concerning the most burning issues in the Internet like data retention and data leeches, hatespeech, whistleblowing or space travel.

What started a few years ago with a single table, some leaflets, Dominic, Eike and me, now has grown into an assembly with 12 members and 21 sessions in three days. Being the host for likeminded organisations, host of noGame and offering workshops, workspace, get together, Free-Software-Song sing-along sessions …

But, as promised in the summary, I will let some pictures speak from here on. If you are interested in more information about our sessions, people and content, get it at the FSFE assembly’s 33c3-wiki-page.

FSFE’s assembly:

CCH turned into CCC

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Push Free Software and Open Science for Horizon2020

Summary: please help us to get the idea about the importance of Free Software as a condition for Open Science into the mind of stakeholders and decision-takers of the Horizon2020 program. You can do so by participating in the interim evaluation and re-using FSFE’s position paper.

What came to my mind the first times that I read “Open Science” was that this term should not be necessary in the first place. In common understanding as well as in its self-conception, “openness” is the elementary part of all science. “Openness” in a sense that all scientific results shall be published publicly along with experimental settings, methods and anything else that leads to their results. It is exactly this approach that – in theory – gives everyone the chance to reproduce the experiment and get to the same results.

But although this approach of openness might still be the noble objective of any scientist, the general idea of a publicly available science is called into question since at least the de-facto domination of publishers over science journals and the creation of a profit-oriented market-design. It cannot be the point of this blogpost to roll out the problematic situation in that nowadays the consumers and the content creators both have to pay publishers for overpriced science journals, financed with public money. Instead, at this point, most important is that these high prices are contrary to the idea of universal access to science as they give access only to those who can afford it.

Send and receive Open Science?

Fortunately, Open Access came up to do something about this problem. Similar to Free Software, Open Access uses free licenses to offer access to science publications to everyone around the globe. That is why Open Access is an important step towards the universal access of science. Unfortunately, in a digital world, Open Access is just one of many tools that we have to use to achieve an Open Science. Equally important is the format and software that is used. Also, Open Access only covers the final publication and misses to cover the steps that lead to there. This is where Open Science steps in.

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Localizing our noCloud slogan

there is noCloud

At FSFE we have been asked many times to come up with translations of our popular “There is no CLOUD, just other’s peoples computers” slogan. This week we started the localization by asking our translator team and have been very surprised to see they already come up with translations in 16 different languages.

In addition, our current trainee Olga Gkotsopoulou and asked her international network and we asked on twitter for additional translations. And, what can I say? crowdsourcing seldom felt so appealing. In two hours we got 8 more translations and after 24 hours we already had 30 translations.

The quickness in that we got so many translations shows us that the slogan is indeed at the pulse of time. People are happy to translate it because they love to send this message out. At the time of writing we now have 36 translations and two dialects on our wiki-page:

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What do political parties in Berlin think about Internet policy issues?

Grumpy Cat builds a GNU Internet (9693327611) This post is for those who who are allowed to vote for the “Abgeordnetenhaus” next Sunday, September 18, but do not speak German and therefore have no clear idea about the different political parties and what they stand for. If you are interested in Internet policy issues, however, I translated the content of a press release by the “Koalition Freies Wissen” (means the coalition of free knowledge) for you, to help you choosing your favorite party.

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10 years of my first Wikipedia article

Today, 10 years ago, I made my first substantial edits into Wikipedia about documentary photography (“Dokumentarfotografie”). It was the same day I started for the first time an article from scratch, about the large passion (“Die große Passion”) by Albrecht Dürer. Looking into the version history of these articles today is interesting from a biographical point of view but also from a technological one.

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